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Monthly Archives: June 2012

By Sean O’Shea, read more at my website http://thegooddog.net/about/

The Good Dog Tip Of The Day: If your dog pulls on leash when you don’t want him to, you have a problem with your relationship. If your dog lunges at, drags you towards, or becomes agitated around other dogs on walks when you don’t want him to, you have a problem with your relationship. If your dog pulls you towards places it wants to sniff or pee when you don’t want him to, you have a problem with your relationship. If your dog jumps on you or your guests when you don’t want him to, you have a problem with your relationship. If your dog barks when you don’t want him to, and you are unable to stop him, you have a problem with your relationship. If your dog races or pushes past you out of the crate, you have a problem with your relationship. If your dog races or pushes past you at any doorway when you don’t want him to, you have a problem with your relationship. If your dog jumps in or out of the car when you don’t want him to, you have a problem with your relationship. If your dog steals food or counter-surfs when you don’t want him to, you have a problem with your relationship.

And on, and on, and on.

If your dog doesn’t respect and defer to you with these small ticket items, please don’t expect to be able to stop or block any of the big ticket items such as dog to dog aggression, human aggression, nervousness/insecurity, or resource guarding.

Until you have established the proper relationship of respect with the small stuff, it makes absolutely no sense to your dog to listen to you for any of the big stuff.

Start small, and work your way up. If you build this foundation, you can change virtually any behavior problem.

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By Sean O’Shea

The Good Dog Tip Of The Day: Correcting unwanted behavior, in the moment it occurs, in a fashion that the dog takes seriously is one of the biggest reasons why a balanced training approach is so powerful, and why this approach is able to fix/solve/resolve behavior problems and issues that rewards only based training is often unable to help with. In an effort to over intellectualize dog training, many trainers have lost sight or forgotten that the greatest dog trainers – dogs themselves – never ignore unwanted behavior (if it is truly something they dislike), never put dogs in time-outs, and never reward good behavior (with anything other than continued social interaction), they simply, and effectively address the problem, in the moment, with whatever level of intensity that particular situation and that particular dog needs. When we take this most natural and common K9 communication off the training table, we end up with lots of stressed out dogs, lots of bad behavior, wasted time, frustrated owners, a compromised relationship/connection with our dogs, and in many cases, dogs being euthanized or surrendered absolutely unnecessarily.